Cal Newport on Digital Minimalism

Georgetown Professor Cal Newport from his latest blog post on Digital Minimalism:

Missing out is not negative. Many digital maximalists, who spend their days immersed in a dreary slog of apps and clicks, justify their behavior by listing all of the potential benefits they would miss if they began culling services from their life. I don’t buy this argument. There’s an infinite selection of activities in the world that might bring some value. If you insist on labeling every activity avoided as value lost, then no matter how frantically you fill your time, it’s unavoidable that the final tally of your daily experience will be infinitely negative. It’s more sensical to instead measure the value gained by the activities you do embrace and then attempt to maximize this positive value.

He then goes on to talk about new platforms that claim to solve problems.

Be wary of tools that solve a problem that didn’t exist before the tool. GPS helped solve a problem that existed for a long time before it came along (how do I get where I want to go?), so did Google (how do I find this piece of information I need?). Snapchat, by contrast, did not. Be wary of tools in this latter category as they tend to exist mainly to create addictive new behaviors that support ad sales.

I agree with where Cal is headed with this article. I'm starting to notice a tension between the virtual world and the real one. While the virtual world has its merits, I find that it's starting to require too much of my attention to justify its worth as a long term investment.